How much does an eye exam cost in Canada

Your eyesight is one of the most valuable assets you have, allowing you to experience the world. Ensuring that your eyes are healthy will pay off in the long run. Getting an annual eye exam is the best step you can take to protect your vision.

Like a visit to the dentist’s office, an eye exam may be inconvenient, but it’s 100% necessary. Even if you feel like you don’t need it, prevention is always better than a cure and saves you money.

With an eye exam, you can catch potential issues before they become a significant problem and preserve your eyesight. However, millions of Canadians still choose to forgo the procedure to cut costs.

Except for children and seniors, some Canadians pay out of pocket for their eye exams. Since government insurance plans don’t cover these checkups, they can get expensive for households with several adults. Additionally, every province has different rules when it comes to coverage for eye exams for those who qualify.

Luckily, those who need an eye exam have options that vary depending on the province.

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How Often Should I Visit an Optical Health Specialist?

Children and infants should see an optical health specialist once every year for a checkup. Seniors over 61 should also see a specialist once a year to monitor changes in their vision.

For healthy adults between the ages of 18-61, it’s best to get an eye exam once every two years or as needed if vision changes are suspected.

What Does an Eye Exam Entail?

Eye exams are a straightforward process, especially if you are a recurrent patient with the same optical specialist. The ophthalmologist or optometrist goes over your medical history. Opticians do not have the qualifications to perform eye exams, so make sure you visit a medical professional.

During your exam, your eye specialist performs tests such as:

Before you consent to any service, make sure you ask about eye exam prices. Although you may see an advertisement for an eye exam at a low cost or free even, the clinic may charge hidden fees for services they did not mention.

If the specialist you are visiting is new, make sure that you do your research ahead of time and check credentials. Only a specialist can perform the necessary examination to determine if you have medical necessities that require coverage.

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How Much Do Eye Exams Cost in Canada?

An eye exam in Canada costs between $80 – $300 in out of pocket expenses. Depending on the province you live in, you may receive services that reduce your costs. In most areas that offer coverage, children and seniors usually receive free annual exams, which makes sense as both age groups experience vision fluctuations.

Below you can check if which specific Canada provinces offer eye care:

What If I am a Small Business Owner?

As a small business owner, you can help cover the cost of eye exams for your employees by adding an extended healthcare benefit policy to your group coverage. Through the system, you can deduct medical expenses on your tax forms and save money. You’ll also help your employees receive the coverage they need to avoid out-of-pocket costs and receive prescription services.

In addition to the exam, an extended healthcare benefit policy also cuts costs on medication. Your staff gets the coverage they need at a cost-effective price with excellent results.

When you purchase extended health care benefits, you’re providing comprehensive healthcare coverage. At Group Enroll, we work with the best insurance providers in Canada to find you group insurance services that provide coverage for vision services that include exams, prescription glasses, and contact lenses.

Don’t let eye exam fees prevent your employees from checking their vision every year. When they have coverage for eye care costs, their health becomes the priority, not their expenditures—and that means healthier, happier staff.

Contact us today to learn more about extended healthcare benefit plans and how they cut costs on eye examinations.

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